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25 Years of Endocrine Disruption Research: Insights from the Director of NIEHS

September 28, 2016
1:00 pm US Eastern Time

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NIEHS 25 years

This call was hosted by the CHE-EDC Strategies Partnership.

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is celebrated “25 Years of Endocrine Disruption Research: Past Lessons and Future Directions” in a meeting to held September 18-20, in Bethesda MD. On this call, Dr. Linda Birnbaum shared her insights from the meeting, which reflected the history of endocrine disruption research, the current state of the science, and future directions for the field.

Featured Speaker

BirnbaumLinda S. Birnbaum, PhD, DABT, ATS, is the director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the National Toxicology Program (NTP). A board-certified toxicologist, she has served as a federal scientist for over 37 years. Dr. Birnbaum is a former president of the Society of Toxicology, the largest professional organization of toxicologists in the world. She is the author of more than 800 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, and reports, and is an adjunct professor at several universities, including Duke University and University of North Carolina. A native of New Jersey, Dr. Birnbaum received her Master of Science and doctorate in microbiology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is married and has three children.

This teleconference call is one in a monthly series sponsored by the Collaborative on Health and the Environment’s EDC Strategies Partnership. The CHE EDC Strategies Partnership is chaired by Carol Kwiatkowski (TEDX), Sharyle Patton (Commonweal), and Genon Jensen (HEAL). To see a full list of past calls in the series and listen to the MP3 recordings please visit the CHE-EDCs Strategies Partnership page.

The call was moderated by Sharyle Patton, director on Commonweal's Biomonitoring Resource Center. The call lasted 30 min and was recorded for archival purposes.