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Blog

Feb 22
2018

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Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Nourbese Flint, MA

Nourbese Flint, MA serves as the Policy Director and manager of reproductive justice programs at Black Women for Wellness (BWW). There, she directs reproductive and environmental health policy, organizes community advocacy, and manages reproductive and sexual health programming as well as civic engagement.

With her work in the policy realm and the reproductive justice world, she knows how important an intersectional approach to a topic can be.  . . .

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Feb 13
2018

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Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Ami Zota, ScD, MS

Ami Zota, ScD, MS has been working in the environmental health world since she was an undergraduate, and a main focus of her work has been looking at the intersection of environmental health and environmental justice.

Much of her research has specifically focused on “[characterizing] exposure to a wide range of environmental hazards in the general population with a real emphasis on identifying vulnerable populations or highly exposed populations,” Dr. Zota says.  . . .

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Jan 18
2018

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what's new
Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Megan Latshaw, PhD

Megan Latshaw, PhD, is all about making public health work for the people. Throughout her career, she has realized public health has the potential to affect communities.

“If you think about what it is that is killing people all around the globe, it is chronic diseases and, as we know, most chronic diseases are not infectious. The Human Genome Project has not provided the key to unlocking chronic disease; I think environmental health and epigenetics is the next frontier in figuring out how we can make the world a healthier place,” Dr. Latshaw shares.  . . .

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Jan 11
2018

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what's new
Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Sara Wylie, PhD

Sara Wylie, PhD developed an interest in science from a young age, having grown up with two developmental biologists as parents. As she got older and started asking her own questions, her focus turned to how chemicals, especially those that look like hormones to the body, can shape the life course. As she went through school and studied to be an anthropologist of science, these interests grew even more complex.  . . .

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Dec 19
2017

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CHE's Next Big Project

Hello CHE Friend,


My name is Emma, and I am CHE’s new Program Associate. I started with CHE in September and have learned so much in these three short months. I studied environmental health a bit during my MPH program at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, but my main focus was on health promotion and communications. Since starting at CHE, I have being learning all about environmental health science and listening to scientists share their work. And, I have been telling anyone and everyone I know about what I am learning because I believe this is stuff everyone should know. This is why I am so excited about starting Because Health.  . . .

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Dec 14
2017

What’s new
Webinars
Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Joan Casey, PhD

Like many who find themselves in environmental health, Joan Casey’s interest in studying the impacts of industrial agricultural came when she heard a startling fact.

“I got involved in doing the antibiotic use in livestock feed work because I took a course where they said that 70% of antibiotics sold for use in the US are used in animal feeds and not in human medicine. That was a really shocking statistic to me,” Dr. Casey shares.  . . .

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Dec 12
2017

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The Impact of our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health

Hi there,

I’m Maria, and I joined CHE in April as program manager. I host our popular webinars, and I love working with leading experts in the field to bring you the latest, cutting-edge environmental health science. I’m thrilled to do this work as I’ve seen its impact: during my six years at Toxic-Free Future, where I ran the Toxics Hotline and conducted research on toxic chemicals in everyday products, my colleagues and I continually relied on CHE for the facts we needed to inform and promote our policy platforms. This resulted in state legislation to reduce environmental risks that harm our health. Through this work, I know that CHE is an invaluable link between information and action, and I have only been more convinced of this during my time at CHE.
 
With attacks on science from so many directions, now is the time to fight back, to spread the information that will drive actions that help turn the tide. CHE’s webinars were already doing this, and this fall we took it to the next level by launching a new series, 20 Pioneers Under 40 in Environmental Public Health. Once a month we highlight a pair of these young and exceptionally talented scientists and advocates, future leaders who are building critical, new knowledge in areas including flame retardants, BPA substitutes, climate change, epigenetics, chemicals in house dust, and disparities in exposure.
 
When we asked established luminaries in the field to nominate pioneers, we knew we would get an impressive group. But, we have simply been blown away by the quality and diversity of the pioneers’ work and the passion behind it. It’s no surprise that these webinars have been among our best attended, and that we have received volumes of positive feedback.
 
Thanks to these pioneers—their expertise, their values, their conviction--I feel hopeful and energized about the future, perhaps more than I ever have.
 
You can help us keep up the momentum by making a tax-deductible contribution today in support of our 20 Pioneers Under 40 in Environmental Public Health series and the creation of other unique webinar series for next year. Every webinar requires research, a nomination process, coordination with speakers and moderators, advertising, and technological management. Together, let’s continue to inspire students and others who are looking for role models. Let’s demonstrate that the future of environmental health science and advocacy is bright and in good hands. Let’s encourage collaborations between scientists in various stages of their careers. Let’s keep paving the path toward the healthier future we know is possible. 
 
We sincerely appreciate any amount you can give. To share the words of Linda Birnbaum, PhD, director of NIEHS, and one of our nominators for the series:
 
“I believe that scientists have a responsibility to share their research as often as possible, especially when it relates to public health. These young scientists are doing exciting, innovative work that will influence how we address environmental challenges to our health in the future.”
 
Please give today, and thank you for being a part of the CHE community.  . . .

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Dec 7
2017

Webinars
Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Brooke Anderson, PhD

With at least 3 major hurricanes (Harvey, Irma, and Maria) hitting the US this season, wildfires covering a good chunk of northern California, and high temperatures breaking records in many states this summer, climate change is front of mind. Extreme weather events are coming and they are getting more intense.

Brooke Anderson, PhD, uses large data sets to analyze the health effects of events like these and look at how they may change in the future. Her work focuses on finding ways to use publicly available, large data sets to think about the health-impacts of extreme climate-related events. To explore this, she and her team are “using models to best predict what might be the health impacts of climate change in the future under different scenarios,” Dr. Anderson says.  . . .

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Dec 5
2017

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A Message from CHE's co-founder, Michael Lerner

By Michael Lerner

Dear CHE Friends,

I hope this finds each of you well. CHE is very close to my heart. I was one of the co-founders who came together to create CHE in 2002 at a meeting at UCSF and shortly thereafter at a second meeting at Commonweal. 

For the past 15 years, CHE has become the leading environmental health science resource for thousands of environmental health advocates, patient advocates, scientists, health professionals, and concerned citizens.  . . .

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Nov 28
2017

What’s new
#GivingTuesday 2017

By Karen Wang, PhD
Director

Dear CHE Friend,

Today, Tuesday November 28th, is #GivingTuesday, a day where millions of people come together to support and champion the causes they believe in.

For CHE, we believe that identifying and reducing environmental risks to human health is essential. We believe that investing in prevention, rather than just treatment, is critical for a healthier and more equitable world. With pollution responsible for 16% of all deaths globally, three times more than AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined, we believe this is no small problem.  . . .

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