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Toxicant and Disease Database

The CHE Toxicant and Disease Database is a searchable database that summarizes links between chemical contaminants and approximately 180 human diseases or conditions. Diseases and or toxicants can be viewed by utilizing the search options below. See a full description of the database and its limitations.

See also CHE's compilation of other Databases and Resources

For questions or comments about the database, please contact Nancy Hepp through our Contact form.

Acute tubular necrosis

Causes    Grouped by strength of evidence

Strong Evidence

1,1-dichloroethane

arsine

cadmium

carbon tetrachloride

chloroform

chromium

lead

mercury

metals

methanol

pentachlorophenol (PCP)

phosphorus

solvents

stibene (antimony)

vanadium

Good Evidence

dioxane

diquat

ethylene chlorohydrin

ethylene glycol ethers

ethylene glycols

ionizing radiation

paraquat

petrochemicals

solvents

tetrachloroethane

toluene

trichloroethylene (TCE)

uranium

vinylidene chloride

Limited Evidence

1,2-dichloroethane

arsenic

bromobenzene

carbolic acid

copper

dinitro-o-cresols

dinitrophenols

glycerol

manganese carbonyls

organophosphates

potassium bromate

solvents

sulfuryl fluoride

tetrachloroethylene (PCE)

tetrafluoroethylene

Notes

Cigarette smokers have double the cadmium exposure of non-smokers resulting in 4-5 times higher blood cadmium levels and 2-3 times higher kidney cadmium levels. In nonsmokers, the main route of exposure to cadmium is through the diet. Inorganic mercury salts are most nephrotoxic. Methanol toxicity is due to the formation of formaldehyde and formate metabolic products. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) causes reversible decreased renal function at subtoxic doses. Arsine causes hemolysis and ATN secondary to hemoglobinuria. Toluene has been implicated as a nephrotoxin in inhalation abuse of solvents and glue.