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Blog

Post category: built environment

Nov 13
2017

What’s new
Webinars
Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Courtney Carignan, PhD

 

Courtney Carignan, PhD, got interested in the field of environmental health, and toxic chemicals more specifically, while she was doing work as an environmental consultant and risk assessor after college. One day when she was doing some indoor air monitoring she had to remove chemicals and paint cans in order to do the testing and wondered about their safety.  . . .

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Oct 19
2017

Webinars
Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Todd Whitehead, PhD

We wanted to find the best young researchers and advocates who might change the future of environmental health. So, we asked a panel of luminaries in environmental health to nominate rising stars who are doing pioneering work. After a rigorous selection process, we invited 20 of these nominees to be our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health.

This month, we held our first webinar in the series. In addition to these presentations, we got to sit down and learn a little bit more about the researchers. While we did talk about their research, we also learned how they first got interested in the field and what this work means to them, plus a few tips for staying healthy.


Todd Whitehead, PhD, works at the Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment (CIRCLE) at the University of California, Berkeley. He initially got involved in this work by looking at flame-retardants in consumer products.  . . .

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Oct 13
2017

Webinars
Meet our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health: Simona Bălan, PhD

By CHE

We wanted to find the best young researchers and advocates who might change the future of environmental health. So, we asked a panel of luminaries in environmental health to nominate rising stars who are doing pioneering work. After a rigorous selection process, we invited 20 of these nominees to be our 20 Pioneers under 40 in Environmental Public Health.

This month, we held our first webinar in the series. In addition to these presentations, we got to sit down and learn a little bit more about the researchers. While we did talk about their research, we also learned how they first got interested in the field and what this work means to them, plus a few tips for staying healthier.


Simona Bălan, one of our first presenters, got her start in environmental health very early. She was 11 when her aunt gave her a book about how chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), used in aerosols and refrigerants, destroyed the ozone layer. While not typically a book that would interest an 11 year old, she found it mind-boggling and felt inspired to study chemistry diligently. As she got older, she realized chemistry alone wasn’t exactly the right path. It wasn’t until she was at Berkeley working on her PhD that she found her real passion in reducing the use of chemicals of concern in products that consumers interact with on a regular basis.  . . .

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Mar 28
2017

What’s new
The WHO’s World Health Day Focuses on Mental Health

By CHE

Every year the World Health Organization (WHO) celebrates the anniversary of its founding by mobilizing around a specific health topic. This year, on April 7, 2017, the WHO will focus on the theme of depression. You can learn more on the WHO's website today. CHE has more resources on environments that can influence your risk for depression including the psychosocial, socioeconomic and built environments. Click on each to learn more.

Feb 15
2017

Guest commentary
What’s new
A Case Study: Tapping the Bioinitiative Website

By Cindy Sage, MA
Owner of Sage Associates, Full Member of the Bioelectromagnetics Society, Co-author of the Bioinitiative Report and CHE Partner

This post will introduce our readers to the BioInitiative website, which makes publications on electromagnetic fields (EMF) and radiofrequency radiation (RF) on health topics accessible. The information is set up to allow users to integrate the EMF and RF information on health into their own practices. I hope other CHE groups will begin to consider how EMF and RF studies, along with other important environmental contaminants, can shape our views on the etiologies of breast cancer, brain cancers, heart disease, neurological diseases, cognitive and neurodevelopmental problems like autism and ADHD, and the fundamental mechanisms involved.

Bioinitiative logoThe Bioinitiative provides broad information the science and public health consequences of EMF and wireless technologies. This website offers an opportunity for CHE members to access many hundreds of scientific abstracts on EMF and RF. The Research Summaries can be downloaded and word-searched by topic or keyword ("hippocampus", for example). The ability to quickly access scientific publications reporting effects (or no effects) is a vital part of research and education. This collection offers rapid access to decision-makers and the public on the state of the evidence for EMF and RF effects on human health. It can help researchers identify common pathways, mechanisms and biomarkers that may overlap with chemical and ionizing radiation, and studies of various disease endpoints (cancers, neurological diseases, neurodevelopmental problems and more).

A CHE ScienceServ that I follow recently included a post regarding a new study of hippocampal activation, increased amyloid accumulation and cognitive decline.Leal SL et al. Hippocampal activation is associated with longitudinal amyloid accumulation and cognitive decline. eLife. 2017. I was able to search the Bioinitiative website for studies on effects of radiofrequency and microwave radiation on the hippocampus and found 44 studies reporting effects on the hippocampus from exposure to radiofrequency radiation, primarily in the cell phone and Wi-Fi frequency ranges. RF/microwave exposures are clearly biologically active in the hippocampus at exposure levels below current safety limits. Such exposures are reported to cause changes in development, structure and function of the hippocampus.

The studies I located provide readers a sense of the scope of information available on the Bioinitiative website:

Nov 5
2016

Guest commentary
Closing the Gap on Health Disparities

By Kathy Sykes
Senior Advisor for Aging and Public Health at the EPA Office of Research and Development

This post is shared with permission from the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. It was originally posted on StatePublicHealth.org. Stylistic edits have been made.

What do health disparities, interest on the national debt, and gun violence have in common? Would you believe it’s economic impact, to the tune of $229 billion dollars? That is not small change. This figure demonstrates the magnitude of an issue that continues to burden our society.  . . .

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