Log in - Help - August 20, 2014
CHE logo The Collaborative on Health and the Environment
This site WWW
PARTNERSHIP EVENTS

Update: CHE does not host calls in August. We will resume calls in September. Watch this box and your email for updates.

CHE Partnership call: PCBs in Schools - Still a Problem?
Tues, Sept 9


CHE Partnership call: Climate Change and Health - What's New and What To Do?
Thurs, Sept 18

7/30/14: MP3 recording available: Aamjiwnaang: A Culture in Shock with Ron Plain

7/10/14: MP3 recording available: Breathing Deep: Air Pollution, Health, and Public Health Policy

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Prenatal Exposure to EDCs and Obesity: Combining Toxicology and Epidemiology with Dr. Juliette Legler

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Fukushima: A View from the Ocean with Kevin Buesseler

6/17/14: MP3 recording available: Nutrition and Toxicants in Autoimmune Disease: Implications for Prevention and Treatment

***

CHE Partners on why they value our work

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW

CHE quarterly Top 10 list available

7/1/14: Each quarter CHE selects 10 topics from hundreds of news articles, research articles, publications, announcements and events in environmental health that are most noteworthy from that quarter. The 2014 2nd quarter Top 10 list is now available on CHE's blog. We invite reader comments and discussion. Additionally, you can now easily see past Top 10 lists by visiting the Top 10 webpage.

Diabetes, obesity, and chemicals - new resource

6/12/14: Sarah Howard, Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group has created a new resource using PubMed collections. She has included all the studies she has found that link environmental chemicals (and some other environmental factors) to diabetes and/or obesity, sorted by topic. You can view the studies in PubMed, or download them directly to your references database on your computer.
Read more

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
Visit the CHE blog Visit CHE's Facebook page
 
EHN News
20 Aug US agency: West Virginia health officials can?t handle chemical incidents. West Virginia's Department of Health and Human Resources lacks a program and properly trained staff to assess community-wide chemical exposures like those that followed the Elk River chemical leak in January, federal public health officials said in a new review made public Tuesday. Charleston Gazette.

20 Aug Even good farming may pollute groundwater in Wisconsin. Two new studies of private well water in Kewaunee County, Wisconsin, have linked contamination to fertilizer, livestock manure and human waste - laying bare a situation that county conservationist Andy Wallander can sum up in a sentence: ?In these shallow bedrock areas, what you put on the surface, you will end up drinking eventually." WisconsinWatch.

20 Aug Why haven't China's cities learned from America's mistakes? Faceless estates. Sprawling suburbs. Soulless financial districts. Discredited elsewhere as fostering the worst kind of urban angst, these are the vogue in China. The Guardian.

20 Aug US sailors prepare for fresh legal challenge over Fukushima radiation. The first time it occurred to James Jackson that there could be lasting damage from his US Navy service during Japan's tsunami and nuclear disaster came when his eldest son, Darius, was diagnosed with leukaemia. The Guardian.

20 Aug Plant that spilled diesel into Ohio River written up by feds in past. The Duke Energy power plant that spilled thousands of gallons of diesel fuel into the Ohio River late Monday has been written up by federal agents in the past. Cincinnati WCPO.

20 Aug Mexico environment official says mining company lied about chemical spill into rivers. Mexico's top environmental official said Tuesday that a mining company lied about a spill of millions of gallons of acids and heavy metals that contaminated two rivers and a dam downstream. Associated Press.

20 Aug The real cougars of Malibu. Murderous family feuds, car accidents, accidental poisoning ? it?s just another day in sunny California for the mountain lions of Malibu. Smithsonian Magazine.

20 Aug Tear gas is an abortifacient. Why won?t the anti-abortion movement oppose it? Though rigorous studies are few, there is evidence that tear gas is an abortifacient. This means it?s likely that police in Ferguson, Missouri, have been spraying abortion-causing chemicals on crowds of civilians. Nation.

20 Aug US EPA to require air pollution measurements in Black communities. For the first time, the Environmental Protection Agency may require oil refineries to regularly measure the air quality at their perimeters. These fence line measurements will give surrounding communities ? largely low-income communities of color ? data on the level of pollution they are exposed to each day. BlackPressUSA.

20 Aug Coal-dependent Arkansas faces stiff emissions target and a running clock. Arkansas saw emissions from its power plants rise 35 percent between 2005 and 2012, even as other states turned to cleaner-burning natural gas and the nation's overall power plant emissions trended downward. National Geographic News.

 

The Collaborative on Health and the Environment
c/o Commonweal, PO Box 316, Bolinas, CA 94924
For questions or comments about the website, email: info@healthandenvironment.org