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From the CHE blog: Your Health This Week - May 22

CHE has been publishing a news feed for several years. We also take a subset of those news stories, journal articles, and announcements that specifically address Your Health — information that you might find useful in safeguarding or improving your own health or that of your family — and publish those as a separate feed. Readers can subscribe to either feed via RSS, but this post initiates a regular series that summarizes and highlights recent Your Health items and trends. This week's post includes stories on reducing exposures to EDCs, label food containing GMOs, indoor air pollution, and how your cell phone might be impacting your brain function.

A Story of Health

New multimedia eBook
receives high praise

4/23/15: Your health. The environment. What’s the story? CHE and partners have created A Story of Health multimedia eBook to investigate just that. How do different aspects of our environment interact with our genes to influence our health across the lifespan? Through the lives of fictional characters, the first three stories explore multiple factors that can contribute to childhood leukemia, asthma, and learning and developmental disabilities. You can download the entire book or individual chapters featuring research about disease origin and helpful facts about disease prevention. Stories on additional health endpoints are forthcoming. 

The eBook is usable by parents and individuals who have no formal training in science or medicine, but it also has layers of additional information and materials for physicians, nurses, and other clinicians who want to dig deeper. In fact, free continuing education credits are available for health professionals from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

A Story of Health has received high praise from health leaders across the country. For example, Brian Linde, MD, Pediatric Hospitalist at Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, California, said, “This is a fantastic resource. It is compelling, educational, and engaging, and will absolutely make a difference.” Lawrence Rosen, MD, Founder of The Whole Child Center, added, “A Story of Health is the most engaging and compelling environmental health resource I’ve experienced. I recommend it for all who care our planet and the impact we have on its health—and vice versa.” Read more testimonials about the value of A Story of Health.

If you have not yet taken a look at A Story of Health we encourage you to do so now. Read it with your family, and share it with your friends and colleagues. It’s free, it’s easy to use, and it draws from the latest research available. You can also listen to the CHE Partnership calls featuring Stephen's story/childhood leukemia and Brett's story/asthma.

A Story of Health was developed by ATSDR, the Collaborative on Health and the Environment (CHE), the University of California, San Francisco, Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (UCSF PEHSU), the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California EPA (OEHHA), and the Science and Environmental Health Network (SEHN).

CHE quarterly Top 10 environmental health stories now available

4/6/1515: CHE offers this selection of research, news and announcements that were of special significance during the first quarter of 2015. Items include research that made a noteworthy contribution to the field, news and announcements that took a conversation to a new level. and/or new audience and some welcome action. This quarter's selections include a discussion of the role of bad luck in cancer, the continuing saga of federal chemical policy reform, the costs of hormone-disrupting chemicals, a couple of success stories, and plenty of research on the impacts of several common toxics on health. Visit the CHE blog to see this quarter's list. We invite comment and feedback.

San Francisco Medical Society journal focuses on environmental health

11/10/14: San Francisco Medicine (SFM), which has been in continuous publication since 1927, is the official journal of the San Francisco Medical Society. Each issue of SFM focuses on a specific topic that affects physicians and their practices, including public health, social, political, economic, and lifestyle issues.The most recent edition of the journal focuses on environmental health and features an article titled The First 1000 Days: A Healthy Return on Investment co-authored by Elise Miller, MEd, CHE's Director, and Ted Schettler, MD, MPH, Science Director at SEHN and at CHE, as well as many other articles that will be of interest to CHE Partners. Visit the San Francisco Medical's Society website to read the full edition.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


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EHN News
29 May Do our bodies safely break down BPA? Fat chance, study suggests. A new study suggests the long-held industry assumption that bisphenol-A breaks down safely in the human body is incorrect. Instead, researchers say, the body transforms the ubiquitous chemical additive into a compound that might spur obesity. Environmental Health News.

29 May Some plastic teething toys may have hormone-altering chemicals. Some plastic teething toys used by infants might contain chemicals that could interfere with the production of hormones needed for normal growth and development, a small German study suggests. Reuters Health.

29 May US EPA proposes temporary pesticide-free zones for honeybees. The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday proposed a rule that would create temporary bans on pesticide spraying in areas where commercial honeybees are being used to pollinate crops. St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

29 May Inside America's secretive biolabs. A USA TODAY Network investigation reveals that hundreds of lab mistakes, safety violations and near-miss incidents have occurred in biological laboratories coast to coast in recent years, putting scientists, their colleagues and sometimes even the public at risk. USA Today.

29 May Connecticut Senate extends pesticide ban to public playgrounds. Environmentalists claimed a partial victory this week after the Senate approved legislation to ban harsh pesticides from public playgrounds but allow their continued use on high school lawns and playing fields. Hartford Courant.

29 May Two radically different cities, and the sustainability challenges they face. Leading a sustainable life in Iqaluit and Johannesburg isn?t always easy, but communities are rallying to overcome long-standing hurdles. The Guardian.

29 May US to limit petroleum drilling on habitat of greater sage grouse. The new plan would create buffer zones around areas where male grouses gather for breeding, many of which abut or are inside oil and gas fields. New York Times.

29 May North Carolina NAACP environmental justice investigation. Civil rights advocates and conservationists from national, state and local affiliations huddled in a Baptist church Wednesday to reinforce what some local folks have already been doing for a while: sound an alarm on the potential health risks posed by fossil-fuel pollution. Winston-Salem Journal.

29 May Food supply fears whet appetite for Dutch farm technology. From the rooftops of Amsterdam to the expanses of Kazakhstan, Dutch technology is helping food producers to meet the needs of both gourmets and growing populations facing uncertain supplies. Reuters.

29 May A proposal to modify plants gives GMO debate new life. Some scientists are hoping techniques that give back to plants genes that had long ago been bred out of them might be more acceptable to opponents of genetically modified organisms. New York Times.

 

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