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PARTNERSHIP EVENTS

CHE Partnership call: Aamjiwnaang: A Culture in Shock with Ron Plain
Wed, July 30
Hosted by the CHE Alaska Working Group

Update: CHE does not host calls in August. We will resume calls in September. Watch this box and your email for updates.

CHE Partnership call: PCBs in Schools -- Still a Problem?
Tues, Sept 9

7/10/14: MP3 recording available: Breathing Deep: Air Pollution, Health, and Public Health Policy

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Prenatal Exposure to EDCs and Obesity: Combining Toxicology and Epidemiology with Dr. Juliette Legler

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Fukushima: A View from the Ocean with Kevin Buesseler

6/17/14: MP3 recording available: Nutrition and Toxicants in Autoimmune Disease: Implications for Prevention and Treatment

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CHE Partners on why they value our work

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW

CHE quarterly Top 10 list available

7/1/14: Each quarter CHE selects 10 topics from hundreds of news articles, research articles, publications, announcements and events in environmental health that are most noteworthy from that quarter. The 2014 2nd quarter Top 10 list is now available on CHE's blog. We invite reader comments and discussion. Additionally, you can now easily see past Top 10 lists by visiting the Top 10 webpage.

Diabetes, obesity, and chemicals - new resource

6/12/14: Sarah Howard, Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group has created a new resource using PubMed collections. She has included all the studies she has found that link environmental chemicals (and some other environmental factors) to diabetes and/or obesity, sorted by topic. You can view the studies in PubMed, or download them directly to your references database on your computer.
Read more

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
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EHN News
30 Jul A watershed moment: Leaping out of the lakes: Invasive mussels spread across America. The last line of defense today against the next zebra mussel invasion of the Great Lakes is a rule that requires overseas freighters to flush their ballast tanks with mid-ocean saltwater before the ships nose into the first navigation lock on the St. Lawrence Seaway. (Part 4 of 4) Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

29 Jul Mercury survivors neglected by government, Grassy Narrows First Nation claims. A northwestern Ontario First Nation has released a five-year-old report confirming the community suffers ongoing effects from mercury poisoning, but it says the government has never acted on the findings. CBC Canada.

29 Jul Emails show secrecy on Canadian oilsands probe. Environment Canada?s enforcement branch asked a spokesman to ?limit information? given to reporters about how long it took to launch a federal investigation into a serious Alberta oilsands leak last summer. Toronto Star.

29 Jul Green going gone: The tragic deforestation of the Chaco. Monolithic agricultural companies are claiming they can practice sustainable farming in the heart of one of the world's most important wildernesses. The ravaged state of the Paraguayan Chaco forest is telling a different story. Rolling Stone.

29 Jul Pennsylvania does little to force farmers to manage manure runoff. Pennsylvania's manure management rules have been on the books since the 1970s, and larger farms have been held to them. But many small Pennsylvania farmers are unaware that the rules exist, according to farmers, conservation agents and environmental advocates. Allentown Morning Call.

29 Jul A watershed moment: Isle Royale National Park ordered its ferry to disinfect water in ballast tanks. Isle Royale National Park Superintendent Phyllis Green pounced when she learned in 2007 that an invasive virus deadly to dozens of freshwater fish species was creeping toward her island ? a reef-rimmed wildlife refuge in the biggest, coldest and wildest of the Great Lakes. (Part 3 of 4) Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

29 Jul Caviar?s last stand. No one knows how many paddlefish once swam the Missouri and Mississippi watersheds, but it?s certain that the fish used to be much more numerous. Why care about paddlefish? They are humanity?s best last chance with sturgeon and their relations. Medium.

29 Jul EPA considering regulating more chemicals under its rule for high-hazard substances. In response to the deadly 2013 explosion at a Texas fertilizer facility, the Environmental Protection Agency is considering adding ammonium nitrate and other substances to those covered by its regulation to prevent high-hazard chemical accidents, the agency announced July 24. Bloomberg BNA.

29 Jul Brazil farmers say GMO corn no longer resistant to pests. Genetically-modified corn seeds are no longer protecting Brazilian farmers from voracious tropical bugs, increasing costs as producers turn to pesticides, a farm group said on Monday. Reuters.

29 Jul Fracking regulators won't create rules for air pollution. As regulators ask the public for comment on fracking rules, one set of rules won?t be under consideration. Those are the rules that govern air pollution at fracking sites, which, in the case of natural gas drilling, can be both acutely hazardous and carcinogenic. North Carolina Health News.

 

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