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PARTNERSHIP EVENTS

CHE Partnership call: Aamjiwnaang: A Culture in Shock with Ron Plain
Wed, July 30
Hosted by the CHE Alaska Working Group

Update: CHE does not host calls in August. We will resume calls in September. Watch this box and your email for updates.

7/10/14: MP3 recording available: Breathing Deep: Air Pollution, Health, and Public Health Policy

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Prenatal Exposure to EDCs and Obesity: Combining Toxicology and Epidemiology with Dr. Juliette Legler

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Fukushima: A View from the Ocean with Kevin Buesseler

6/17/14: MP3 recording available: Nutrition and Toxicants in Autoimmune Disease: Implications for Prevention and Treatment

6/12/14: MP3 recording available: Using Cumulative Impacts Analysis to Protect Public Health with Dr. Peter Montague

6/10/14: MP3 recording available: Catch of the Day: Healthy Fish, Healthy Humans

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CHE Partners on why they value our work

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW

CHE quarterly Top 10 list available

7/1/14: Each quarter CHE selects 10 topics from hundreds of news articles, research articles, publications, announcements and events in environmental health that are most noteworthy from that quarter. The 2014 2nd quarter Top 10 list is now available on CHE's blog. We invite reader comments and discussion. Additionally, you can now easily see past Top 10 lists by visiting the Top 10 webpage.

Diabetes, obesity, and chemicals - new resource

6/12/14: Sarah Howard, Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group has created a new resource using PubMed collections. She has included all the studies she has found that link environmental chemicals (and some other environmental factors) to diabetes and/or obesity, sorted by topic. You can view the studies in PubMed, or download them directly to your references database on your computer.
Read more

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
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EHN News
24 Jul The Obama administration safety agency at war with itself. Personnel disputes are tearing the Chemical Safety Board apart, leaving the panel's work unfinished?and workers at risk. National Journal.

24 Jul US Department of Transportation proposes stricter oil train safety rules. The Obama administration called Wednesday for a ?new world order? in how the U.S. regulates the trains that carry crude oil across the country, addressing a series of fiery derailments that have inspired fears about the dark side of the North American energy boom. Politico.

24 Jul Feds to conduct more studies of MCHM. Federal scientists will conduct new studies to examine the potential health effects of exposure to the chemicals released during the January leak at the Freedom Industries tank farm along the Elk River in Charleston, under an agreement announced Wednesday. Charleston Gazette.

24 Jul Revealed: The dirty secret of the UK?s poultry industry. Three of the UK?s leading supermarkets have launched emergency investigations into their chicken supplies after a Guardian investigation uncovered a catalogue of alleged hygiene failings in the poultry industry. The Guardian.

24 Jul Food safety in China still faces big hurdles. China has been scrambling to right its gargantuan processed-food ship ever since six infants died and thousands more were hospitalized with kidney damage in 2008 from milk adulterated with an industrial chemical. New York Times.

24 Jul Proposed oil train safety rules include lower speeds, improved braking. The Transportation Department on Wednesday issued proposed rules to upgrade the safety of trains carrying crude oil, following half a dozen explosions that occurred in the last year after derailments in the United States and Canada. Los Angeles Times.

24 Jul Panel's report likely to tie farm antibiotics to human resistance. A White House advisory committee is expected to acknowledge the link between antimicrobial resistance in humans and livestock being fed antibiotics when it issues its report in the next few weeks, according to the transcript of a committee meeting held earlier this month. Reuters.

24 Jul Why is Canada?s bee population in rapid decline? A new report on the health of honey bees in Canada says 58 percent of the colonies in Ontario did not survive the winter. Among the possible causes cited for the colony failures are starvation during a long winter, weak queens, viruses, and poisoning from pesticides. Globe and Mail.

24 Jul The man who wants to make sure climate change doesn?t ruin your beer. Goose Island beer mostly starts out as water from Chicago's municipal supply, which is copious, glittering and immortalized in two blue bands on the city's flag. The water is a brewer's dream. Ian Hughes wants to keep it that way. Climate change appears to be complicating his task. Washington Post.

24 Jul If it's raining, NYC's raw sewage is probably pouring into the waterways. When it rains in New York City, raw sewage bypasses treatment plants and flows directly into city waterways. Even a relatively small amount of storm water - one-twentieth of an inch of rainfall - can overwhelm New York?s aging sewer system. Newsweek.

 

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