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PARTNERSHIP EVENTS

CHE Partnership call: Only One Chance: How Contaminants in our Environment Impair Brain Development
Wed, Feb 4
Hosted by the CHE Alaska Working Group

CHE Partnership call: Placental Toxicants and Disruption to Development
Wed, Feb 25
Hosted by the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group

CHE Partnership call: Environmental Influences on the Thyroid System
Thurs, Feb 26

CHE Partnership call: Flame Retardants and Public Health: Fire Safety Without Harm
Wed, March 4
Hosted by the CHE Alaska Working Group

1/22/15: MP3 recording available: A Story of Childhood Leukemia, A Story of Health: Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia

1/21/15: MP3 recording available: Environmental Exposures and Immune Function with Dr. Paige Lawrence

1/8/15: MP3 recording available: The State of the Water: Linking Ocean Health to Human Health
 

12/10/14: MP3 recording available: Health Effects of Perinatal Exposures to BPA and Other Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs): State of the Science and Policy Update

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CHE Partners on why they value our work

Transgenerational Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Environmental Obesogens in Rodents

Mar 20, 2013

This call was hosted by the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum and CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Groups

Accumulating scientific research suggests that exposure to environmental chemicals early in life can affect the risk of obesity in later life. Chemicals that can increase the risk of obesity are known as “obesogens.” Two recently published animal studies take obesogen research one step further: both found that the obesity-related effects of prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals were passed down to the third generation descendants of the exposed animals.

On this call we heard the authors of these studies discuss their results. Dr. Bruce Blumberg, who coined the term “obesogen” and has done extensive research on the topic, discussed his work on prenatal exposure to the obesogen tributyltin and its effects on fat cells in mice and their offspring. Dr. Michael Skinner, who has conducted extensive research on the transgenerational effects of various chemical exposures, discussed his findings on the transgenerational effects in rats of prenatal exposure to a mixture of BPA and phthalates.

This call was moderated by Sarah Howard, National Coordinator, CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ, National Coordinator, CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group.

Featured speakers:

Bruce Blumberg, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Developmental and Cell Biology at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Blumberg’s laboratory investigates the role of nuclear hormone receptors in development, physiology and disease. Dr. Blumberg and his colleagues originated the obesogen hypothesis which holds that developmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can induce permanent physiological changes. EDC exposure elicits epigenetic alterations in gene expression that reprograms the fate of mesenchymal stem cells, predisposing them to become fat cells. Exposed animals develop more and larger fat cells, despite normal diet and exercise, which is likely to lead to weight gain and obesity over time.
 

Michael Skinner, PhD, is a professor in the School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University. Dr. Skinner’s research is focused on the investigation of how different cell types in a tissue interact and communicate to regulate gonadal growth and differentiation, with emphasis in the area of reproductive biology. Recent studies have elucidated several critical events in the initiation of male sex differentiation, testis development and ovarian primordial follicle development. His current research has demonstrated the ability of endocrine disrupting chemicals to promote transgenerational epigenetic disease phenotypes due to abnormal germ line programming in gonadal development.

 

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