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News and Announcements

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Topic-specific News

Items specific to any of the topics in the What We Know section of this site are displayed in the left sidebar of those pages. The same is true for our ScienceServ and Special Partnerships pages.

News and announcements related to environmental impacts on human health, collected from a multitude of sources, especially Environmental Health News. For additional items or to subscribe to this feed, visit healthandenvironment.org/CHE.xml.

CHE offers this information as a service but does not endorse any of the events, articles or announcements.

Occurrence and in vitro bioactivity of estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid compounds in a nationwide screen of United States stream waters.

April 25, 2017

Incorporation of in vitro bioassays as complements to chemical analyses in standard water quality monitoring efforts would allow for more complete assessment of the chemical mixtures present in many surface waters. Environmental Science & Technology.

Expanded target-chemical analysis reveals extensive mixed-organic-contaminant exposure in US streams.

April 25, 2017

The 10 most-frequently detected anthropogenic-organics included eight pesticides (desulfinylfipronil, AMPA, chlorpyrifos, dieldrin, metolachlor, atrazine, CIAT, glyphosate) and two pharmaceuticals (caffeine, metformin) with detection frequencies ranging 66–84% of all sites. Environmental Science & Technology.

Governor Cuomo announces new regulations to require disclosure of chemicals in household cleaning products.

April 25, 2017

Copies of the Draft 2017 Household Cleaning Product Information Disclosure Certification Form are available on DEC’s website. Public comment on the form will be accepted through June 14, 2017.

Flame retardant chemicals in college dormitories: flammability standards influence dust concentrations.

April 25, 2017

Student dormitory rooms tended to have higher levels of some FRs compared to common rooms, likely a result of the density of furniture and electronics. Environmental Science & Technology.

Cardiovascular and respiratory conditions linked to drought.

April 25, 2017

Researchers at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies have found that drought-prone conditions such as low rainfall may increase the risk of mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses during the onset of high-severity drought. Yale News.
[See the study: Drought and the risk of hospital admissions and mortality in older adults in western USA from 2000 to 2013: a retrospective study]

Pollution from Canada’s oil sands may be underreported.

April 25, 2017

The study shows that air samples collected using aircraft may be a more accurate way to tally air and climate pollution from oil and gas production than using industry estimates. Climate Central.
[See the study: Differences between measured and reported volatile organic compound emissions from oil sands facilities in Alberta, Canada]

Study: Fracking didn’t impact West Virginia groundwater, but wastewater spills pollute streams.

April 25, 2017

Fracking the Marcellus Shale did not pollute groundwater in northwestern West Virginia, but wastewater spills did contaminate surface water, according to a new study from Duke University. NPR State Impact.
[See the study: The geochemistry of naturally occurring methane and saline groundwater in an area of unconventional shale gas development]

Bacteria may be reason some foods cause heart disease, stroke.

April 25, 2017

"The new study provides the first direct evidence in humans that consuming excess choline, an essential nutrient plentiful in a Western diet, raises both levels of the bacteria-produced compound, called trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), and the tendency of platelets to clump together and form clots," the American Heart Association, which publishes Circulation, said in a statement. NBC News.
[See the study: Gut microbe-generated trimethylamine N-oxide from dietary choline is prothrombotic in subjects]

Consumers being misled by labeling on 'organic' beauty products, report shows.

April 25, 2017

The makers of many “organic” beauty products have been accused of confusing and meaningless labelling, according to a new survey in which 76% of consumers admitted they felt misled. The Guardian.
[See more about the Come Clean About Beauty League Table]

Concerns explode over new health risks of vaping.

April 25, 2017

Researchers link e-cigs to wounds that won't heal and 'smoker's cough' in teens. Science News for Students.
[See the studies not previously included here: Myofibroblast differentiation and its functional properties are inhibited by nicotine and e-cigarette via mitochondrial OXPHOS complex III, Electronic cigarette use and respiratory symptoms in adolescents and E-cigarettes as a source of toxic and potentially carcinogenic metals]

'It's going to hit the poorest people': Zika outbreak feared on the Texas border.

April 25, 2017

As mosquito season ramps up again, activists and health workers fear the worst for the the Rio Grande Valley, where conditions are ripe for mosquitoes to breed. The Guardian.

That perfect, toxic lawn: American suburbs and 2,4-D.

April 25, 2017

Originally developed as a chemical weapon, this weedkiller can be found in garages across America. Los Angeles KCET TV, California.

Ninth Circuit upholds cellphone warning law.

April 25, 2017

In a 2-1 decision, a Ninth Circuit panel on Friday refused to overturn a ruling upholding a Berkeley, California, law that forces retailers to warn consumers about the potential health risks of cellphones. Courthouse News Service.

Diet rich in plant protein may prevent type 2 diabetes.

April 24, 2017

While plant protein may provide a protective role, meat protein was shown to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Medical News Today.
[See the study: Intake of different dietary proteins and risk of type 2 diabetes in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study]

At least global warming may get Americans off the couch more.

April 24, 2017

With less chilly winters, Americans will be more likely to get outdoors, increasing their physical activity by as much as 2.5 percent by the end of the century, according to a new study in Monday's edition of the journal Nature Human Behaviour. But the affect varies by month and location. Associated Press.
[See the study: Climate change may alter human physical activity patterns]

The risks of lifetime environmental exposures explored at YSPH symposium.

April 24, 2017

Leading scientists from around the United States and England discussed the challenges associated with exposome research as well as its potential to transform environmental epidemiology. Yale School of Public Health.

Use of antibiotics linked autoimmune diseases.

April 24, 2017

According to research conducted by a team of scientists in Australia, giving antibiotics to children impedes the normal growth and development of "good" bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract (gut). Nairobi Daily Nation, Kenya.
[See the study: Early-life antibiotic treatment enhances the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells during intestinal inflammation]

Free bicycles reducing pollution in China.

April 24, 2017

What began as an experiment to see if it was possible to reduce both air pollution and congestion has become a major success story, not just in Hangzhou but in 175 cities across the country. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the Hangzhou Bicycle Service is that it makes a profit. Climate News Network.

These 6 activists are risking it all in the name of environmental justice.

April 24, 2017

The 2017 Goldman Environmental Prize winners fight mining, poaching, and deforestation—sometimes at great personal risk. Outside.

Big Agro on campus.

April 24, 2017

Universities claim industry-funded research on chemical and pesticide safety is scientifically sound. Not everybody is convinced. The Walrus, Canada.

Cancer has exploded in Bihar as people drink water poisoned with arsenic.

April 24, 2017

Arsenic levels in water have been as high as 3,880 parts per billion in parts of the state. Pollution standards cite 50 parts per billion as harmful. Scroll.in, India.

The unintended consequences of a gluten-free diet.

April 23, 2017

Despite such a dramatic shift in the diet of many Americans, little is known about how gluten-free diets might affect exposure to toxic metals found in certain foods. Epidemiology.

We need a strong Environmental Protection Agency: It’s about public health!

April 23, 2017

From the cholera outbreaks of the 19th century and the Great Sanitary Movement to today's global threat of climate change and the Paris Agreement, the protection of public health depends on the protection of our environment. American Journal of Public Health.

Report links welding fumes with risk of cancer.

April 23, 2017

“The Working Group found new evidence to support the conclusion that welding fumes are a likely cause of lung cancer in humans, possible cause of kidney cancer, and definite cause of melanoma of the eye,” Christiani said. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health,
[See the study: Carcinogenicity of welding, molybdenum trioxide, and indium tin oxide]

The Environmentalist Papers make the case for conservation in the age of Trump.

April 22, 2017

In the spirit of the Federalist Papers, this new collection of essays tries to make it clear to the new administration that there are massive economic benefits in our environmental regulations. Fast Company.
[See The Environmentalist Papers: A Science-Based Case for Action to Protect Human Health]

Goodbye, candy counter: CVS embraces store redesign.

April 22, 2017

CVS executives said Wednesday that they would implement the new format at several hundred stores by the end of 2018, demonstrating the company’s commitment to remake itself as a beacon of healthy living rather than a place devoted primarily to treating illnesses and selling candy bars. USA Today.

The unfolding tragedy of climate change in Bangladesh.

April 22, 2017

A three-foot rise in sea level would submerge almost 20 percent of the country and displace more than 30 million people—and the actual rise by 2100 could be significantly more. Scientific American.

CVS announces removal of harmful chemicals from beauty products.

April 22, 2017

The Cut reports that the retail chain will be removing all products containing harmful known toxins like parabens and phthalates, as well as the most common formaldehyde contributors from their store-brand beauty prods—i.e. the CVS Health, Beauty 360, Essence of Beauty, and Blade lines. Teen Vogue.

 

People trust science. So why don't they believe it?

April 22, 2017

The General Social Survey shows that although trust in public institutions has declined over the last half century, science is the one institution that has not suffered any erosion of public confidence. So why all the headlines about the "war on science"? USA Today.

Hundreds more lead hotpsots are identified as Trump prepares to gut programs.

April 22, 2017

An ongoing Reuters investigation has found another 449 areas around the US with lead exposure rates double those found in Flint. But cities across the country say pending federal budget cuts could imperil efforts to eradicate the toxic metal. Reuters.