Reflections upon the death of a hero, Dr. Herbert Needleman.
Friday, July 21, 2017
Dr. Needleman was a pediatrician and a psychiatrist. He had a strong sense not just of the injustice of lead poisoning, but that this poisoning affected far more people than the dozens of children with seizures and coma who died of it each year in American cities. Environmental Health News.

Treated fracking wastewater contaminated watershed with radium and endocrine disrupters, study finds.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
A study in the Marcellus Shale region of western Pennsylvania has shown that even after being treated, wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations left significant contamination in a waterway downstream of treatment plants. Yale Environment 360.

How to prevent dementia: managing smoking, hearing loss and depression can ward off condition.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
An international team of scientists found that up to a third of dementia cases across the globe could be prevented through non-pharmacological interventions, such as exercise, social contact and weight management. Newsweek.

The lead crisis: tackling an invisible, dangerous neurotoxin.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
Tulane University School of Medicine Professor Howard Mielke has been on a journey that has stretched decades to try to help save the country's children from a danger hidden in the soil on which they play. Think Progress.

Under Trump's orders, EPA considers gutting lead contamination rules even as water in schools tests positive.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
Under the leadership of the Trump administration, which has pledged to slash federal regulations at every level, lead protections and regulations may be at risk. Truthout.

Left-sided cancer: blame your bed and TV?
Thursday, July 20, 2017
As we sleep on our coil-spring mattresses, we are in effect sleeping on an antenna that amplifies the intensity of the broadcast FM/TV radiation. Scientific American.

New report: Sidelining Science from Day One.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
This report from the Union of Concerned Scientists details how the Trump presidency has shown a clear pattern of actions that threaten public health and safety by eroding the role of science in policy.

Understanding the needs, challenges, opportunities, vision, and emerging roles in environmental health.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
Understanding the Needs, Challenges, Opportuni­ties, Vision, and Emerging Roles in Environmental Health (UNCOVER EH), has the potential to increase awareness of the profession by obtaining information directly from environmental health professionals about their practice and the challenges they currently face andenvision for the future. Journal of Environmental Health.

Job opening, Oakland, California.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
The Center for Environmental Health seeks a Managing Director of Programs to lead program strategy and enhance the effectiveness of program staff. Candidates must have ten to fifteen years of professional experience, including progressively responsible leadership positions and experience supervising multiple direct reports.

Half of all plastic that has ever existed was made in the past 13 years.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
Researchers have published a sweeping, public, and in-depth accounting of all plastic that has ever been made in the entire world. The number is so big as to defy human comprehension: 8,300 million metric tons since 1950. Of this, 6,400 million metric tons has outlived its usefulness and become waste; 79 percent of that waste is sitting in landfills or the natural environment, 12 percent has been incinerated, and just 9 percent has been recycled. The Atlantic.

A new environment for climate change litigation.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
Both the denial of the motion to dismiss and the denial of the interlocutory appeal In Juliana v. United States represent an unusual judicial receptiveness to climate change litigation. The fate of Juliana and other cases like it is worth watching closely as the federal judiciary reacts to the new administration. Marten Law.

Transgenerational transmission of asthma risk after exposure to environmental particles during pregnancy.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
The data indicate that pregnancy airway exposure to diesel exhaust particles triggers a transgenerationally transmitted asthma susceptibility and suggests a mechanistic role for epigenetic alterations in dendritic cells in this process. American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

New report: Application of Systematic Review Methods in an Overall Strategy for Evaluating Low-Dose Toxicity from Endocrine Active Chemicals.
Wednesday, July 19, 2017
From the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, this report proposes a strategy that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should use to evaluate the evidence of adverse human health effects from low doses of exposure to chemicals that can disrupt the endocrine system.

Is blue light bad for your health?
Wednesday, July 19, 2017
Last year, the US National Toxicology Program convened a 2-day workshop to explore mounting research linking exposure to artificial light at night not just to sleep problems, but also to weight gain, depression, cancer, and heart disease. Web MD.    

The costs of coal storage and its impact on disadvantaged communities.
Monday, July 17, 2017
Increases in the level of coal stockpiles held by US power plants increase local air pollution levels, which in turn increases the average infant and adult mortality rates in the communities near these plants. Environmental News Network.

Study: mountaintop coal mining causes Appalachian rivers to run "consistently saltier."
Monday, July 17, 2017
"Over time, alkaline salts and other contaminants from the coal residue and crushed rocks in these valley fills leach into nearby streams and rivers, degrading water quality and causing dramatic increases in salinity that are harmful to downstream ecosystems," says Fabian Nippgen, assistant professor of ecosystem science and management at UW. Environmental News Network.

Epigenetics between the generations: we inherit more than just genes.
Monday, July 17, 2017
Researchers show robust evidence that not only the inherited DNA itself but also the inherited epigenetic instructions contribute in regulating gene expression in the offspring. ScienceDaily.

New resource: Toxic Docs (Alpha).
Monday, July 17, 2017
This dataset and website, presented jointly by Columbia University's Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health and the City University of New York's Graduate Center, contain millions of pages of previously secret documents about toxic substances.

What to do when a child has a toxic exposure.
Monday, July 17, 2017
When encountering a patient who may have toxic environmental exposures in your community, there is a free, regionally based national network of experts available to help you: the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSU). Medscape.

Ozone pollution connected to cardiovascular health.
Monday, July 17, 2017
Exposure to ozone, long associated with impaired lung function, is also connected to health changes that can cause cardiovascular disease such as heart attack, high blood pressure and stroke, according to a new study of Chinese adults. Duke University News.

Stress and poverty may explain high rates of dementia in African-Americans.
Monday, July 17, 2017
Harsh life experiences appear to leave African-Americans vulnerable to Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, researchers reported Sunday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in London. Weekend Edition, NPR.

Paradise cost: coal, natural gas, and the true price of power.
Monday, July 17, 2017
Despite the Trump administration’s attempts to roll back regulations on the mining and burning of coal, natural gas is rapidly becoming the power industry’s fuel of choice. It’s a switch that also brings big changes for the region’s economy, environment, and public health. Ohio Valley ReSource.

Environmental regulations weren't created without cause.
Monday, July 17, 2017
Join us on a trip to the 1960s and early 1970s with this true-or-false test about the Clean Water Act, which turns 45 this year, and the Clean Air Act, which is 2 years older. Las Vegas Sun, Nevada.

In the Grand Canyon, uranium mining threatens a tribe's survival.
Monday, July 17, 2017
The Havasupai are attempting to fight back against the operation of a uranium mine that they say could contaminate their sole water source. The Guardian.

A pass to poison.
Monday, July 17, 2017
In Texas, companies emitting excess air pollution are often let off the hook. That's thanks in part to a provision in Texas law that allows polluters to claim that such emission events are unavoidable to escape penalties. But an even bigger factor is a general unwillingness by state environmental regulators to challenge them on those claims, the Tribune has found. Texas Tribune, Texas.

Climate-altering gases spiked in 2016, federal scientists report.
Sunday, July 16, 2017
The climate-warming influence of greenhouse gas emissions rose more quickly last year than it has in nearly three decades, an increase scientists attributed in part to a strong El Niño weather pattern, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported this week. New York Times.

Rising seas could force a large-scale retreat from US shores within decades.
Sunday, July 16, 2017
A new study by the Union of Concerned Scientists offers us the best look yet into how coastal communities will experience debilitating inundation this century. Grist.

The Louisiana environmental apocalypse road trip.
Sunday, July 16, 2017
Louisiana serves as a terrifying example of what can become of a state that shortchanges science and environmental regulations to boost industry and infrastructure. Longreads.

Mortality from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease among different occupation groups—United States, 1985–2011.
Sunday, July 16, 2017
This study identified higher ALS and Parkinson's disease mortality among workers in higher socioeconomic status occupations, but was unable to identify occupational or nonoccupational factors that might explain these findings. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

New report: Local Health Department and School Partnerships: Working Together to Build Healthier Schools.
Sunday, July 16, 2017
From the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, this report uses the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model builds on five tenets, providing a valuable framework to address the important relationship between student learning and health.

Harmless elements can replace toxic lead in electronics.
Sunday, July 16, 2017
"Now, we are able to produce the films in the laboratory, so the next step is to find a way to produce quantities that are large and cheap enough to be used industrially." ScienceDaily.

Four myths about water fluoridation and why they're wrong.
Friday, July 14, 2017
Evidence gathered over 60 years about adding fluoride to drinking water has failed to convince some people this major public health initiative is not only safe but helps to prevent tooth decay. The Conversation.

The effects of exposure to low frequency EMF on male fertility.
Friday, July 14, 2017
The reviewed studies provided contradictory results that were highly dependent on the exposure parameters, such as the shape and frequency of wave, intensity, duration, and timing of the exposure. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine.

Influence of radiofrequency-electromagnetic waves from 3rd-generation cellular phones on fertilization and embryo development in mice.
Friday, July 14, 2017
Rates of fertilization, embryogenesis, and blastocyst formation did not change significantly across the four groups. Considering that the degree of exposure in the present study was ≥100 times greater than daily exposure of human spermatozoa and even greater than daily exposure of oocytes, the present results indicate safety of RF-EMW exposure in humans. Bioelectromagnetics.

Selective changes in locomotor activity in mice due to low-intensity microwaves amplitude modulated in the EEG spectral domain.
Friday, July 14, 2017
Exposing mice to 8 Hz AM significantly reduced locomotor activity in an open field immediately after exposure which normalized after 4 weeks. Neuroscience.

Patterns of cellular phone use among young people in 12 countries: implications for RF exposure.
Friday, July 14, 2017
These results provide valuable insights to the design, analysis, and interpretation of future epidemiological studies concerning the health effects of exposure resulting from cellular phone use in young people. Environment International.

How diet may affect age-related macular degeneration.
Friday, July 14, 2017
Switching mice from a high glycemic diet to a low glycemic diet stopped the development of certain signs of age-related macular degeneration. National Institutes of Health Research Matters.

Podcast: Mixed metals exposures in children, with Robert O. Wright.
Friday, July 14, 2017
Environmental Health Perspectives Host Ashley Ahearn discusses the neurodevelopmental effects of metals mixtures with researcher Robert O. Wright: the combination of both having a high exposure to manganese and a high exposure to lead was more toxic than having exposure to only one of those two metals.

Contaminants in food: identifying and assessing risks as early as possible.
Friday, July 14, 2017
The recently published special issue "Contaminants in Foods" gives an overview of the assessment strategies of possible health risks and explains what properties and hazard potential the contaminants entail, where they come from and to what extent people are exposed to them (in German). Bundesinstitut für Risikobewertung.
[See the special issue: Contaminants in Foods]

They said lead was safe. They said smoking was good for you. What are they selling now?
Thursday, July 13, 2017
A new team of reporters investigates how toxic chemicals are undermining our health and why government is failing to stop it. Modeled after the original 60 Minutes legendary journalists, you can meet the 60 MiNueTs Toxic team and follow their investigations.

Everyday chemicals linked to chronic disease in men.
Thursday, July 13, 2017
Chemicals [phthalates] found in everyday plastics materials are linked to cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure in men, according to researchers. ScienceDaily.

The chemicals in your mac and cheese.
Thursday, July 13, 2017
The chemicals, called phthalates, can disrupt male hormones like testosterone and have been linked to genital birth defects in infant boys and learning and behavior problems in older children. The chemicals migrate into food from packaging and equipment used in manufacturing and may pose special risks to pregnant women and young children. New York Times.

Chronic liver inflammation linked to Western diet.
Thursday, July 13, 2017
Mice fed a Western diet, which is high in fat and sugar, resulted in hepatic inflammation, especially in males. ScienceDaily.

House dust spurs growth of fat cells in lab tests.
Thursday, July 13, 2017
Small amounts of house dust containing many of these compounds can spur fat cells to accumulate more triglycerides, or fat, in a lab dish. Among the 44 individual common house dust contaminants tested in this model, pyraclostrobin (a pesticide), the flame-retardant TBPDP, and DBP, a commonly used plasticizer, had the strongest fat-producing effects. ScienceDaily.

Maternal intake of sugar during pregnancy and childhood respiratory and atopic outcomes.
Wednesday, July 12, 2017
Our results suggest that a higher maternal intake of free sugar during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of atopy and atopic asthma in the offspring, independently of sugar intake in early childhood. European Respiratory Journal.

The association between the incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer and concentrations at street-level of nitrogen dioxide and ultrafine particles.
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
Our findings suggest that exposure to ambient NO2 and UFPs may increase the risk of incident postmenopausal breast cancer especially amongst cases with positive oestrogen and progesterone receptor status. Environmental Research.

We are all lab rats in a massive cell phone study.
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
Many people in the "cell phones can't hurt you" camp have long argued that, because the kind of radiation a phone emits doesn't heat tissues or cells, there's no biological mechanism by which that radiation could cause you harm. Bucher says his group's findings, if they're validated with follow-up research, would kneecap this argument. Tonic.

First-trimester urinary bisphenol A concentration in relation to anogenital distance, an androgen-sensitive measure of reproductive development, in infant girls.
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
Higher first-trimester BPA exposure was associated with significantly shorter AGD in daughters, suggesting that BPA may alter the hormonal environment of the female fetus. Environmental Health Perspectives.

Prostate cancer risk and DNA methylation signatures in aging rats following developmental BPA exposure: a dose–response analysis.
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
Developmental BPA exposures heighten prostate cancer susceptibility in a complex dose- and lobe-specific manner. Environmental Health Perspectives.

Serum vitamin D and risk of breast cancer within five years.
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
In this cohort of women with elevated risk, high serum 25(OH)D levels and regular vitamin D supplement use were associated with lower rates of incident, postmenopausal breast cancer over 5 y of follow-up. Environmental Health Perspectives.

Trump's environmental rollbacks are hitting major roadblocks.
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
White House plans to scrap restrictions on the release of a potent greenhouse gas are getting stymied by the courts, by forceful public opposition and even by Republicans in Congress. Los Angeles Times, California.

Drink coffee? It won't hurt you, and may reduce your risk of an early death.
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
The studies reinforce previous findings that drinking an 8-ounce cup of joe (or three) won't hurt you, but the authors of the new works and other experts say caveats abound. StatNews.

How is pollution connected to race and inequality?
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
The Trump administration has proposed cutting the EPA's budget by 30 percent. What does that mean for polluted communities in the US? Puget Sound KUOW Public Radio, Washington.

A new air quality monitoring and early warning system: air quality assessment and air pollutant concentration prediction.
Monday, July 10, 2017
The forecasting results indicate that the proposed hybrid model is remarkably superior to all benchmark models on account of its higher prediction accuracy and stability. Environmental Research.

Urban natural environments as nature-based solutions for improved public health—a systematic review of reviews.
Monday, July 10, 2017
The results show that there is strong evidence for improved affect as well as on heat reduction from urban natural environments. These conditions may mediate the effect seen on cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality by exposure to natural environments. Environmental Research.

Nature-based solution for improving mental health and well-being in urban areas.
Monday, July 10, 2017
The results of this study have shown that recuperation from stress, depression and anxiety was possible and much more complete when participants were involved in horticulture therapy as a nature-based solution for improving mental health. Environmental Research.

Wildfires take health toll as climate change helps usher in 'new normal.'
Monday, July 10, 2017
“What we’re seeing right now—and what we saw in Alberta last year—we are conditioned to think of as extreme events,” she said, “but I think we have to start shifting our thinking such that we perceive them as what could be the new normal, and the need for adaptation to these events within our health authorities and larger populations themselves." Metro, Canada.

Despite the myth, sustainable farming methods can lead to high-yield agriculture.
Monday, July 10, 2017
According to the government's own data, the rate of increase of farm yields in the pre-green revolution years (growing traditional varieties) was higher than in post-green revolution years when exotic HYVs (high-yielding varieties) necessarily requiring high doses of chemical fertilisers and pesticides were spread over hundreds of thousands of hectares very quickly. The Wire.

Survey results: shoppers voting for safe and healthy products with their wallets.
Monday, July 10, 2017
Health-conscious shoppers want safe and healthy products free of dangerous chemicals—and they will reward retailers and manufacturers who provide them. Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families.

Scientists concerned about future of international collaboration.
Monday, July 10, 2017
In an age of shifting political climates—namely, Brexit and policies such as US President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration—many researchers are rethinking how they approach international collaborations. The Scientist.

Levels and determinants of DDT and DDE exposure in the VHEMBE cohort.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
Mothers reporting to have lived in a home sprayed with DDT for malaria control had ∼5–7 times higher p,p′-DDT and p,p′-DDE serum concentrations than those who never lived in a home sprayed with DDT. Of the five potential interventions tested, we found increasing access to water significantly reduced p,p′-DDT exposure and increasing the frequency of household wet mopping significantly reduced p,p′-DDT and p,p′-DDE exposure. Environmental Health Perspectives.

Parental occupational exposure to organic solvents and testicular germ cell tumors in their offspring: NORD-TEST Study.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
Overall, no association was found between prenatal maternal exposure to solvents and TGCT risk. In subset analyses using only mothers for whom occupational information was available in the year of or in the year prior to the child's birth, there was an association with maternal exposure to aromatic hydrocarbon solvents, driven by exposure to toluene. Environmental Health Perspectives.

Maternal and cord blood manganese concentrations and early childhood neurodevelopment among residents near a mining-impacted Superfund site.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
Maternal blood manganese concentrations were negatively associated with early childhood neurodevelopment scores in our study. Environmental Health Perspectives.

The joint effect of prenatal exposure to metal mixtures on neurodevelopmental outcomes at 20–40 months of age: evidence from rural Bangladesh.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
Employing a novel statistical method for the study of the health effects of chemical mixtures, we found evidence of neurotoxicity of the mixture, as well as potential synergism between arsenic and manganese. Environmental Health Perspectives.

Perfluoroalkyl substances during pregnancy and offspring weight and adiposity at birth: examining mediation by maternal fasting glucose in the Healthy Start Study.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
Maternal perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA) concentrations were inversely associated with birth weight. Adiposity at birth was approximately 10% lower in the highest categories of PFOA, PFNA, and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) compared to the lowest categories. Environmental Health Perspectives.

US state prosecutors join push to ban pesticide chlorpyrifos.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
Democratic attorneys general for New York, Maryland, Vermont, Washington, Massachusetts and the District of Columbia filed a motion to intervene in a case environmental and social advocacy groups brought in a federal appeals court on June 5. It challenges EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's March 29 decision not to ban chlorpyrifos from US foods. Reuters.

Controversy, questions surround California’s listing of weed killer as cancer cause.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
A particularly contentious part of the ongoing battle now surrounds what level of exposure California might allow without any warnings. Environmental Health News.

Deaths from cancer higher in rural America, CDC finds.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
Despite decreases in cancer death rates nationwide, a new report shows they are higher in rural America than in urban areas of the United States. Washington Post.

Could air pollution and racism be hidden causes of breast cancer?
Sunday, July 9, 2017
Some researchers are treating the disease as a public health problem, not just a biomedical one. They emphasize not only treatment but also prevention through policy changes to limit environmental exposures, shifting the burden from women to society. OZY.

Air pollution is as unhealthy as secondhand smoke, a new study says.
Sunday, July 9, 2017
A survey by Carnegie Mellon University of 1,200 children living near some of the biggest polluters in the Pittsburgh area shows that children who live near sources of pollution run the same risk of developing asthma as those exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. Living On Earth.

Pediatricians’ group ‘deeply alarmed’ at EPA’s pesticide decision.
Friday, July 7, 2017
In a letter Tuesday to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, the American Academy of Pediatrics, along with the Environmental Working Group, accused the EPA of ignoring its own findings that chlorpyrifos poses specific risks to children, infants and developing fetuses. The Hill.

Effects of low-dose developmental bisphenol A exposure on metabolic parameters and gene expression in male and female Fischer 344 rat offspring.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
Developmental exposure to 0.5 μg/kg BW/d of BPA, which is 8–10 times lower than the current preliminary EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 4 μg/kg BW/d and is within the range of environmentally relevant levels, was associated with sex-specific differences in the expression of genes in adipose tissue plasma triglyceride levels in males and adipocyte cell density in females when F344 rat offspring of dams exposed to BPA at 0.5 μg/kg BW/d were compared with the offspring of unexposed controls. Environmental Health Perspectives.

Trump's alarming environmental rollback: what's been scrapped so far.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
Unlike the travel ban or healthcare, Trump has faced few obstacles in sweeping away what he has called “job-killing” environmental rules that address problems such as climate change, water pollution and smoggy air. The Guardian.

Court blocks EPA effort to suspend Obama-era methane rule.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
Dealing a legal blow to the Trump administration, a federal appeals court ruled on Monday that the Environmental Protection Agency cannot suspend an Obama-era rule to restrict methane emissions from new oil and gas wells. New York Times.

On US rivers, Teflon's old cancer ties are stoking new fears.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
A new generation of chemicals [GenX and perfluorinated compounds, or PFAS]—designed to be safer than the old ones—that are used in Teflon cookware, waterproof fabrics and grease resistant food packaging are raising concerns. Bloomberg News.

Living in California's San Joaquin Valley may harm your health.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
More than 1 million people in the region have been exposed to unsafe drinking water in recent years from pesticides, arsenic, nitrate and uranium. And many communities also face multiple environmental health threats. Water Deeply.

High-resolution air pollution mapping with Google Street View cars: exploiting big data.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
Resulting maps of annual daytime NO, NO2, and black carbon at 30 m-scale reveal stable, persistent pollution patterns with surprisingly sharp small-scale variability attributable to local sources, up to 5–8× within individual city blocks. Environmental Science & Technology.

Environmental health disparities in the Central Appalachian region of the United States.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
The limited public health studies available focus primarily on the impacts of coal mining and do not measure personal exposure, constraining the ability to identify causal relationships between environmental conditions and public health. Reviews on Environmental Health.

Septic systems are a major source of emerging contaminants in drinking water.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
A new analysis shows that septic systems in the United States routinely discharge pharmaceuticals, consumer product chemicals, and other potentially hazardous chemicals into the environment. Phys.org.
[See the study: Review of organic wastewater compound concentrations and removal in onsite wastewater treatment systems]

Antibiotic resistance linked to common household disinfectant triclosan.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
The scientists showed that the quinolone-resistance mutation altered the way the bacteria package their DNA inside a cell and that these mutants had also turned on various self-defence mechanisms—together these gave triclosan resistance. Quinolone antibiotics are an important and powerful group of human medicines, and this new discovery raises concerns that the use of triclosan can give antimicrobial resistance. ScienceDaily.
[See the study: Quinolone-resistant gyrase mutants demonstrate decreased susceptibility to triclosan]

High-fat diet in pregnancy increases breast cancer risk over generations in animal study.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
Feeding pregnant female mice a diet high in fat derived from common corn oil resulted in genetic changes that substantially increased breast cancer susceptibility in three generations of female offspring, report scientists. ScienceDaily.
[See the study: Maternal intake of high n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid diet during pregnancy causes transgenerational increase in mammary cancer risk in mice]

How babies' environments lead to poor health later.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
New research underscores how environmental conditions early in development can cause inflammation in adulthood—an important risk factor for a wide range of diseases of aging, including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, autoimmune diseases and dementia. ScienceDaily.

Extreme events conference highlights risks to the elderly.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
At the Trans-Federal Workshop on Extreme Events, Environmental Health, and the Elderly, top researchers joined representatives of elder groups and community organizations to focus on research, cultural impacts, and sustainable solutions to protecting health in extreme events. NIEHS Environmental Factor.

​Air pollution knocks a decade off life expectancy.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
The new calculation focuses on a subset of the population that is affected by the conditions triggered or exacerbated by air pollution—people with lung cancer, asthma or heart conditions, for example. International Business Times.
[See the study: Co-benefits of climate mitigation: Counting statistical lives or life-years?]

EU experts agree on criteria for endocrine disrupting chemicals in pesticides.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Experts from the 28 EU member states approved on Tuesday (4 July) a proposed list of criteria to identify endocrine disruptors in plant protection products—a move presented by the European Commission as a step towards a broader regulatory system for similar chemicals used in cosmetics, toys and food packaging. EurActiv, Belgium.

Why tiny particles of pollution increase the risk of premature death in older Americans.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Long-term exposure to certain kinds of air pollution increases the risk of premature death in Americans over 65 years old. That finding holds true even at levels of air pollution below national standards. Environment Report.
[See the study: Air pollution and mortality in the Medicare population]

Cocoa and chocolate are not just treats—they are good for your cognition.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Cognitive performance was improved by a daily intake of cocoa flavanols. Factors such as attention, processing speed, working memory, and verbal fluency were greatly affected. These effects were, however, most pronounced in older adults with a starting memory decline or other mild cognitive impairments. ScienceDaily.
[See the study: Enhancing human cognition with cocoa flavonoids]

Racism tied to worse asthma symptoms for black youth.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
African-American children and young adults with a hard-to-treat type of asthma may have a more difficult time keeping symptoms in check when they have experienced racial discrimination, a recent study suggests. Reuters.
[See the study: Self-reported racial/ethnic discrimination and bronchodilator response in African American youth with asthma]

Local trans fat restrictions help hearts.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Researchers compared outcomes from 2002 to 2013 for people living in New York counties with and without the restrictions. They found that after three or more years of a ban being enacted, people living in the affected area had a 6.2 percent decline in hospitalizations for stroke and heart attack compared with those who did not live in areas with trans fat bans. The Nation's Health.

Sprucing up vacant urban land could reduce crime.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Over time, neighborhoods with low levels of greening activity were associating with more intense and oscillating hot spots for property crimes. Meanwhile, cold spots for all types of crime were associated with higher levels of neighborhood greening. Over time, higher greening scores were more closely linked to lower rates of all types of crime. The Nation's Health.

Too much folate in pregnant women increases risk for autism, study suggests.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
The researchers found that if a new mother has a very high level of folate right after giving birth—more than four times what is considered adequate—the risk that her child will develop an autism spectrum disorder doubles. ScienceDaily.

Banned chemicals pass through umbilical cord from mother to baby, research finds.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Trace amounts of flame retardants, banned in the US for more than a decade, are still being passed through umbilical cord blood from mothers to their babies, according to new research. The chemicals are linked to health concerns including hormone disruption and low birth weight. ScienceDaily.
[See the study: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (flame retardants) in mother-infant pairs in the southeastern US]

Call for nominations: EPA Science Advisory Board.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Nominations are sought for several Science Advisory Board committees.

Call for nominations: EPA's Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Members are appointed by the EPA Administrator for a three-year term and serve as Special Government Employees who provide independent expert advice to the agency. Nominations are sought by July 27, 2017.

US EPA issues final TSCA framework rules.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
The release of the documents comes on the one-year anniversary of passage of the Frank R Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act—and on its statutory deadline for actions that must be completed within a year of the law's passage. Chemical Watch.
[See the EPA's Assessing and Managing Chemicals under TSCA]

Call for proposals: Health Disparities and Alzheimer's Disease.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Health-disparities research related to AD should include the study of biological, behavioral, sociocultural, and environmental factors that influence population level health differences. Research approaches of interest include 1) improving recruitment and retention of populations underrepresented in AD research; 2) identifying priority factors or locating pathways and mechanisms that create and sustain AD health disparities; 3) addressing the challenges faced by informal/family caregivers from diverse racial, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds that are associated with the growing population of individuals with Alzheimer's Disease; and 4) understanding the disparities in access to and utilization of formal long-term supports and services for those with dementia. The next application deadline is October 5th.

Call for proposals: Education and Health: New Frontiers.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
The goal of this funding opportunity announcement is to support research that will further elucidate the pathways involved in the relationship between education and health outcomes and in doing so to carefully identify the specific aspects and qualities of education that are responsible for this relationship and what the mediating factors are that affect the nature of the causal relationship. The next funding deadline is October 5th.

Call for proposals: Research to Action: Assessing and Addressing Community Exposures to Environmental Contaminants.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
This Funding Opportunity Announcement encourages applications using community-engaged research methods to investigate the potential health risks of environmental exposures of concern to the community and to implement an environmental public health action plan based on research findings. The next deadline is October 5th.

Call for proposals: Environmental Exposures and Health: Exploration of Non-Traditional Settings.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
This funding opportunity announcement encourages interdisciplinary research aimed at promoting health, preventing and limiting symptoms and disease, and reducing health disparities across the lifespan for those living or spending time in non-traditional settings (i.e. playgrounds and nursing homes). The next application deadline is October 5th.

Call for proposals: Developing Healthy Places.
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Through this focus area, The Kresge Foundation is accepting proposals for its Healthy Housing and Neighborhoods Initiative. This is an open grant opportunity for organizations working to address policies, systems change and communication to connect health and housing; policies that promote healthy housing and mitigate the impacts of substandard housing; and innovative investments that connect community development, health and housing. There is no deadline.